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Private Military/Security Companies 

Private Military Companies or Private Security Companies are a reality in 21st century conflicts all around the globe.  Often mistaken with their ancient predecessors (the so-called mercenaries), offer their protection/defensive services to both private and public clients, including NGOs, United Nations, aid agencies and goverments.

This site is a portal which offers news and articles on this topic. A controversial topic which gains more and more public attention due to their status as civilians and increasing casualties among this group of operators .

Together with the whole private security community we are crediting their sacrifice. Be it to their country, their client or asset to be protected or their buddies working at their side. 
 
Addax uses Nigeria navy staff to guard oil facilities Print
Mon 13 Oct 2008 - By David Sheppard

LONDON, Oct 13 (Reuters) - Militant and pirate activity in Nigeria's oil producing south has led Canada's Addax Petroleum <AXC.TO> <AXC.L> to hire ex-U.S. military speed boats staffed by Nigerian navy personnel, the company's CEO said.

Jean Claude Gandur, chief executive officer of the oil exploration and production firm, told Reuters in an interview that an attack on an Addax supply vessel in June, which left one of its contractors dead, had forced the company to act.


A wave of militant attacks in the restive Niger Delta region has cut Nigerian oil output by around a fifth since early 2006.

Security experts say it is unusual for a company to be so frank about its relationship with the Nigerian military.

"There has long been a perception, one that is entrenched in Nigeria, that there is a lot of influential cooperation between the oil companies and the military," said Antony Goldman, an analyst at London-based PM consulting.

"Many people suspect it goes on, but it's very rare for an oil company to be so explicit about their relationship. These relationships have created problems for oil companies in Nigeria in the past."

Gandur said that since his company undertook the new policy, there had not been any attacks on installations belonging to Addax, one of the largest independent oil producers in West Africa.

Foreign oil companies routinely hire private security contractors in southern Nigeria but are often cautious about explicit relationships with the military, whom militants and rights groups have in the past accused of human rights abuses.

SECURITY

"We have had meetings with the ministry of energy in Nigeria and we came to the conclusion that the best way is to take care of our own security against the pirates," Gandur said in a telephone interview.

Addax also had meetings with naval authorities to discuss the situation, he said.

"We came to an agreement where we used some of the national forces to serve those armoured ships which are now patrolling around our installations to make sure our supply boats and installations are well protected."

Gandur said they had hired the ex-military boats from a private firm, before the Nigerian navy equipped them with heavy machine guns and staffed them with Nigerian military personnel.

The boat is under the company's control, he added.

Security experts have said that Nigeria's navy is underequipped to deal with the militants, who use small fast speedboats to navigate the delta's narrow creeks, forcing oil firms to take their own additional measures.

Chevron Corp <CVX.N> faces trial in San Francisco on Oct. 27 relating to claims by Nigerian residents that Nigerian security forces hired by Chevron fired on them in 1998, killing two, as they protested over polluted drinking water.[ID: nN28451177] (Reporting by Margaret Orgill; editing by James Jukwey)
 
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